Oct 18, 2007

Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Still Affordable Under the New Bankruptcy Law

In 2005, the bankruptcy laws underwent massive changes at the behest of the banks and credit card companies. In advance of the new law's taking effect, the nation's bankruptcy attorneys launched a scare campaign directed at potential filers. The message was, "You better do it now because it will be too late once the legislation kicks in."

Beaucoup bucks flowed to the lawyers. When the new law finally arrived, the public perception was that the bankruptcy safety net was gone forever. Not true. Chapter 7 bankruptcy is alive and well; it's only the attorneys who are suffering because they doubled their fees and nobody can afford them anymore.

In a recent interview with Lisa Scherzer on Smartmoney.com, Henry Somer, President of the National Association of Consumer Bankruptcy Attorneys, said that bankruptcy was no longer an available remedy for most people due to doubled attorneys fees and increased complexity. While it's true that bankruptcy attorneys have priced themselves out of the market, the supposed reason for doing that--added complexity--is horsepuckey. It's just as easy to get rid of debt such as credit card and medical bills under the new law as the old. And, most bankruptcies still are procedurally very straightforward. Somer, however, clearly believes you need an attorney to file bankruptcy, and if you can't afford one, oh well.

Apparently Somer hasn't heard of self-representation or non-lawyer assistance with bankruptcy forms--both of which are perfectly legal. Or maybe he has, but takes the prototypical lawyer position that doing your own bankruptcy is like doing your own brain surgery. Jeez, self-help law has been around for 35 years at least, but you would never know it from the Somer interview. There is help out there for folks who need bankruptcy but can't afford a lawyer.

A bankruptcy petition preparer (a non-lawyer) can prepare your petition for you for about $150. It's true that non-lawyers can't provide legal advice--or alert you to a problem with your petition --but there's nothing to stop bankruptcy lawyers from giving the public a break and providing the necessary legal information while letting the non-lawyers fill in the forms. For example, people doing their own bankruptcies can get all the legal help they need from me for a flat rate of $100. In this manner, self-represented filers can proceed in an informed manner with the help of an attorney and a forms expert (bankruptcy petition preparer)--and pay less than 25% of what they would pay an attorney for full representation.

Future blogs will cover such bankruptcy related issues as:


  • best practices for people doing their own bankruptcies

  • why the new bankruptcy laws don't work

  • how bankruptcy can be used to stave off foreclosures

  • why Chapter 13 is only for people who think they'll go to heaven if they repay their debt, and

  • turf wars over non-lawyer bankruptcy form preparation services.


For more information about Chapter 7 bankruptcy and your options, take a look at How to File for Chapter 7 Bankruptcy, by Attorneys Stephen R. Elias, Albin Renauer, and Robin Leonard (Nolo).